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Historic Maryland mansion floats down Chesapeake Bay – Meredith Fine Properties

by Lesly Salazar/ABC7

A 255-year-old historic Maryland mansion is in the final stages of being transported 50 miles from Easton to Queenstown.

The mansion had been located in Easton since it was constructed in 1764 for the newly married William Nicols and Henrietta Maria Chamberlaine Nicols, according to a website dedicated to the move.

“Facing years of unoccupied neglect and the endless march of suburban sprawl, the historic Galloway mansion … had a bleak future,” according to EastonHouseMove.com.

“In order to keep this amazing piece of American history and architecture from succumbing to these forces, we decided to do the seemingly unthinkable – pick the whole house up, brick chimneys and all, drive it six miles through the town of Easton, load it on a barge, and then float it 50 miles through the Chesapeake Bay to its new home in Queenstown, Maryland. There, it will be restored to the original Georgian masterpiece that was once proudly called ‘Galloway.'” (The driving distance between Easton and Queenstown is far less than 50 miles, but the complicated travel plan added distance.)

ABC affiliate WMDT reports that a man named Christian Neeley bought the house and planned the complicated move.

Earlier this month, the home traveled across Route 50 and down Route 322 on wheels, causing some road closures. See pictures of that HERE.

On Wednesday, it was placed on a barge so it could float the rest of the way to a historic estate with more rural surroundings, which Neeley also purchased, WMDT reports.

WMDT also reports this interesting historical tidbit, as if pulling up an entire house by its roots and floating it down the bay on a barge could get much more interesting: One of the daughters of the Nicols family was married to a man named Edward deCoursey, whose family once owned the estate the house is being moved to – Cheston on the Wye.

Her grave is only about 500 feet from where the house will eventually sit on that property.

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